Historical Romance

Sacrifice & Share: Home Attitudes during World War II

by Cece Whittaker

Not surprisingly, the World War II era is a favored setting for historical romance novels. One of the many reasons for this is the common phenomenon of personal sharing. At home in America, it was a special time in recorded history during which general goodwill and sacrifice was the way of life. Scaring up an extra plateful for someone’s visiting cousin or fellow worker was not embarrassing or something to put up with. It was an opportunity to serve, and as such, a powerful weapon against depression and confusion.

baby children cute dress
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

“Share and Play Square”

Most of the drive behind taking the high road was dedicated to support, whether toward the men at the front, the men and women at home on base, or in factories, or even the children coming up in what would otherwise be an unacceptably tumultuous world. The country was ripe with helpful and inspirational slogans.  Terrence Witkowski in his work, “The American Consumer Home Front During World War II,” agrees. He feels that this element of World War II’s history telling has been largely “Produce and Conserve, Share and Play Square.” (Witkowski, 1998)

“Meatless Monday”

Something about the feeling of we’re-all-in-this-together provides comfort and closes out thoughts of who will get that paralyzing telegram next, and what will the papers say tomorrow? Limited meat resources created almost a celebration in offering up a meatless night of the week, usually Monday. For Catholics, this was a double, as Fridays without meat were already the rule. “Rationing meant sacrifices for all,” the author of World War II Rationing says. He further describes “Sugar Buying Cards,” which allotted specific measures of sugar which families were eligible to buy, based on the number of family members.   (World War II Rationing, n.d.) See more about the Meatless Monday at www.u-s-history.com.

Some historical romance novels celebrate the humanity and laughter, but also include sacrifice and the heartache of separation during this very emotional, yet kindness and sharing time. My series contributes in that direction. www.cecewhittakerstories.com.

Bibliography

Witkowski, T. H. (1998). The American Consumer Home Front During World War Ii. ACR North American Advances. Retrieved 7 27, 2018, from http://acrwebsite.org/search/view-conference-proceedings.aspx?id=8204

World War II Rationing. (n.d.). Retrieved 7 27, 2018, from U-s-history.com: http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1674.html

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s