Author · Christian Author · Historical Romance

Return to Simple?

What are women readers seeking today?

Having worked through the myriad of spy and terrorist stories, all packaged in shiny, flashy covers featuring nearly exposed women and bare-chested males glittering in sweat, women and old and young may now be turning to a more wholesome entertainment in ladies’ fiction.

Capturing times gone by, without altering the actual circumstances, many newer writers are focusing on the positive side. The post-Babyboomer writer, sometimes referred to as the Babyboomer II, seems to want to concentrate on spreading hope and humor. These 53-60-year-olds graduated high school during very difficult times, having been confronted with the introductions of the first gasoline “crunch,” Jimmy Carter tax expansion, and Richard Nixon China trade. Work was not as freely available to this group as it was to their boomer predecessors.

Taking the high road

According the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 1982, conditions of unemployment ranked highest since 1947, at 9.7% that year, followed by only a slight drop in 1983, at 9.6%. Without the rapid rise on the traditional job track, post-Boomers in large part turned to hope. Writing wholesome ladies’ fiction is one growing outlet. “I’ve been accused of being an optimist and a fantasizer,” says author of The Call to Serve, Cece Whittaker, “and if that’s true, I guess it’s a good thing. As a writer, that’s what keeps me going.”

It may be fantasy, but decorum and wholesome entertainment are not new, just not recent. According to http://www.thegreatestbooks.org, Don Quixote, In Search of Lost Time, and War and Peace all rank in the top 5 of the most popularly acclaimed books of all time, not to mention the wild frenzy for Pride & Prejudice.

What’s Ahead?

Not to say you can’t still find that blockbuster with dirty teeth, but the late 20-teens are seeing a rebirth of decorum and genuine inspiration. Not surprisingly, the movement is led by a refreshing return of wholesome entertaining ladies’ fiction.

 

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